Two years ago we need a file sharing service in our department at work, so I looked into all the options available. As I mentioned in a previous post, I like to do short Pros and Cons and see which option works would work best for us. Back then Dropbox was by far the best option, but Google and Microsoft have really upped their games. So here it is, Dropbox Vs Google Drive Vs OneDrive!

Dropbox

Pros

  • Fast Sync and Selective Sync
  • Integrates great with many other apps and devices
  • Version history in case you delete or overwrite a file
  • Easy file sharing
  • Stellar Business Option
  • Auto upload pics from your phone

Cons

  • You only get 2GB for free (with opportunities to earn bonus space)
  • No 100GB Option. Goes straight from 2GB to 1TB.

Google Drive

Pros

  • 15GB for free. Only $1.99/mo for 100GB
  • Version history in case you delete or overwrite a file
  • Easy file sharing
  • Google Photos sync for saving pics from your phone
  • More than one person can edit a file at the same time

Cons

  • Tries to tie you into their own Productivity apps instead of properly working with Word, Excel, etc.
  • Because it’s tied to your Google account, it’s not ideal for installing on multiple computers

OneDrive

Pros

  • 15GB for free. Only $1.99/mo for 100GB
  • 1 TB $6.99/month which includes Office 365
  • Version history in case you delete or overwrite a file
  • Easy file sharing
  • Works seamlessly with Word, Excel, and Powerpoint.

Cons

  • Integration with other apps is still coming
  • Desktop sync not in real time (when tested last year)

For our office In the end I opted for Dropbox for Business. It had all the features I was looking for in our department including a pseudo “File-Lock” that lets you know when someone is editing a document you’re looking at. It made sense for us because we already had Office software and weren’t interested in 365. Had we needed 365, OneDrive would have been a serious contender on the business front. Google Drive falls short because their productivity apps aren’t as robust as Microsoft Office. It might work great for small businesses that don’t push a lot of documents or large documents.

For personal use, it’s hard to top Google Drive or OneDrive because they give you 15GB right off the bat. I’m surprised Dropbox hasn’t upped their capacity, and would expect them to follow suit as most all three (and the countless other options) are continually upgrading services.

Ultimately it’s easy to migrate to a different platform, so making the “right” choice isn’t as critical as you might think. There are even services that take care of the migration for you like mover.io.

Author Matt

I'm a husband, father, leader, and geek whose time is wrapped up in faith, family, film, and travel. I guess I'm a little like the equivalent of a utility player in baseball. I'm happy with not being the best at something as long as I'm always trying to get better.

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